Medical Conditions

No matter how hard we try to stay fit, eat right, and do everything that we know is great for our health, we’re all bound to experience some sort of medical condition at some point in our lives. No one is perfect; some of us have conditions that we’ve been managing since birth, others have more recent issues that we’re still learning about — and everything in between. At CDPHP, we have resources that address topics ranging from the common cold and flu to cancer and diabetes.

Whether you’ve been recently diagnosed with an illness, or you’re managing one that you’ve had for a long time, or if you are pregnant, quitting smoking, or dealing with a mental health and substance abuse issue, we want to help you find the resources you need. Here, we’ll talk about ongoing changes in the medical community that might affect how you handle one of these conditions, along with where you can go for additional information or in-person help. Of course, we’ll discuss the questions that are top of mind, and we’ll feature articles written by providers who are experts in these fields.

Our goal at CDPHP is to keep you healthy; that could mean fitness and nutrition, banishing a smoking habit, exploring options to deal with mental health conditions, or giving you tools to be successful in managing a disease. Your health is our priority.

Recently posted in Medical Conditions

Seasonal affective disorder

SAD May Be Making You Sad

Like many people who live far from the equator, you may find yourself eating more, sleeping more, and feeling grouchy during the dark days of winter. These reactions are not unusual for most of us, but some may experience an even more debilitating condition each year known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD). continue reading →

epilepsy

Understanding and Controlling Epilepsy

When a person has two or more unprovoked seizures, they have epilepsy. This disorder affects nearly 3 million people in the United States, making it the fourth most common neurological condition. It is more prevalent than cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and autism combined. continue reading →