August 24, 2017 Healthy Living

Achieving a Smoke-Free Life

There’s no denying the harmful effects of smoking tobacco. It damages almost every organ in the body and causes several diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes (to name a few). In fact, tobacco use is the single greatest preventable cause of disease and premature death in not only the U.S., but in the world.

With Great Challenges Come Great Rewards

 Some may think that it’s too late to quit smoking and that the damage is already done. But this is not the case! Quitting smoking has immediate effects on your health. Within just 20 minutes of quitting, your heart rate and blood pressure drop. After 12 hours, the carbon monoxide in your blood stream drops to normal. In two to three weeks, your circulation and lung function improve and your risk of having a heart attack decreases. The following are some of the less immediate, yet significant, health benefits of quitting:

In one to nine months, you will cough less and breathe easier.

 

In one year, your risk of coronary heart disease is cut in half.

 

In two to five years, your risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder is cut in half, and your risk of stroke is reduced to that of a non-smoker.

 

In 10 years, you are half as likely to die from lung cancer, and your risk of kidney or pancreatic cancer decreases.

 

In 15 years, your risk of coronary heart disease is the same as a non-smoker’s risk.

 

We all can agree, smokers and non-smokers alike, that quitting is no easy feat. Nicotine is very addictive and it makes quitting extremely difficult for some. Yet, it’s important to remember that millions of smokers have successfully quit and are proof that it is possible. In fact, the smoking rate among adults in the U.S. is at an all-time low of 15 percent, compared to roughly 42 percent 50 years ago when smoking was commonplace.

CDPHP Can Help You Become an Ex-Smoker for Good
To support the downward trend and help our members* kick their smoking habit for good and live longer, healthier lives, CDPHP® has partnered with Roswell Park Cancer Institute to offer a new no-cost telephonic smoking cessation program called CDPHP®Smoke-FreeTM.

Simply call 1-866-697-8487 to get started or visit www.cdphp.com/quitsmoking and click on Discover CDPHP Smoke-Free to complete a form to request a phone call from a quit coach. From there, you will receive one-on-one support and help with developing a quit plan from a specialized quit coach. Quit-smoking medications, such as nicotine patches, lozenges, or gum, will also be available. Additionally, you’ll have access to resources and educational materials to help you plan and stay on track.

Data shows that a combination of personalized counseling, appropriate medication, and consistent support increases your chances of successfully quitting and overcoming obstacles and cravings.

If you or a loved one is thinking about quitting or is ready to quit now, CDPHP Smoke-Free can help you achieve your goal. Take the first step to becoming an ex-smoker and living a healthier life today!

 

*CDPHP® Smoke-FreeTM is available to CDPHP commercial and Medicaid members.

Lisa Fox
About Author

Lisa joined CDPHP in July 2016 as a population health and wellness specialist. In her role, she develops and implements programs and initiatives in partnership with employers, community partners, and providers to promote healthier lifestyles and improve health outcomes. Lisa’s professional career has always been focused on improving the health of populations through effective behavior change strategies. Over the years, she has worked on a variety of public health projects within the private, public, and non-profit sectors in Washington, DC, and Boston. She holds a Master of Public Health degree from George Washington University and a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from SUNY Albany. Since moving back to the area, Lisa has set her sights on becoming an Adirondack 46er with her husband, Ryan, and their labradoodle, Harbor.

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